Stencils for Food Justice!

Hey folks, Thanks for all the Twitter follows and Facebook likes! We are so grateful for all of the retweets and shares about our Call for Submissions (due 4/1/15). To show our appreciation, we put together a packet of stencils that you can print on 8.5×11″ paper (feel free to go bigger though at your local print shop) and cut out to spray/paint onto all kinds of surfaces! Here is a tutorial on how to go from image to stencil: tutorial.

You can either make a stencil that will last for a few sprays by cutting out the stencil on a regular piece of paper, or you can glue the printed sheet onto something more durable (see here) like card stock or transparency sheets and cut it out with an exacto knife. Then you’re ready to go! If you give it a try, show us the final product by tweeting at us @youthfjzine or sharing it on our fb page: facebook.com/youthfoodjusticezine

Share widely and make sure you submit to our first Youth Food Justice Zine! 

Thanks!

Love,

Ayisah, Victoria, Beatriz, and Miyuki

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The Food Games 🌎🌱🍐❤️

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Hi Readers! Ayisah Yusuf here one of the 4 awesome youth food justice activist working on the Youth Food Justice Zine.

I wanna draw your attention to a little post from last April I wrote on my blog: https://iceturtlegirl.wordpress.com if you ever wanna check it out.

Food what a wonders thing. It fuels our bodies and helps get us through the day. But food can have its draw backs as well. You eat too much you get fat so you eat too little and your too skinny. So many rules of what to eat, how to eat and what you should and should not eat. But if food is suppose to help nourish your body then why is there always a big fuss over it. Food should be comforting, nourishing, tasty, beautiful and full of love. Food is a gift from your our Earth Mother (most of it) and she is a loving mother and she takes her time to grow (with help from us) our food for us to consume. Her lushes fruits and nuts her beautiful veggies ready for picking right out of the ground and her herbs from plants that heal us when we are sick. When we take the food she has provide for us and start to over analyze this food then it becomes less about the love and more about eating just to stay alive. For me food is life! To worry about how some food may make you fat is taking food for granted. Eat if your hungry that’s what food is there for. Of course try to eat the right kind of foods that only come from Mother Earth and not from a factory and be healthy about your decisions but eat. Take the time to pick your food from the Earth and cook your food with fresh ingredients and take the time to really taste and savor the food you have just prepared. I feel love is the key to life and food is love so we must learn to love eating for the power of love. If the creator made you fat or skinny they must of had a reason and as long as you eat healthy and live a loving life through food you might just gain or loose that weight ;D
PS- A nice jog or walk through Mother Earth might also help 😉

Food for me is a cultural & spiritual connection to our Mother Earth. Growing up the food I ate was very diverse coming from different cultural backgrounds. I started out my food journey as a vegetarian just like my dad. My parents wanted to raise me very healthy & from an Afro-centric/Muslim standpoint . My parents have these friends who always made the best spinach pie, falafel and baclava. Then you had my dad who is from NOLA and loves to eat grits. He also used to try and get my family to drink smoothies which at the time felt awful but I’ve wised up lol. When I was about 7 or so my sister introduced me to soda & McDonalds on a trip to the beach. I got hooked for a while (not on the soda but on the McDs) which my dad always says ruined me lol. So I went through my fast food fase till I was about 12 & then I wised up. Then it became the constant struggle of learning to eat veggies again.

Growing up my parents had many people from different cultures stay at my house as well as travel with them so I got to try different cultures food in that way too. They also had a diverse group of friends from different cultures who would cook for us as well. People from Africa- Senegal who stayed at my house made this drink called Bissap which was like their version of iced tea. Then some close friends to my mom would make us some traditional Trinidad food like Pelau which is chicken & peas. Then when I visited South Dakota when I was 8 and stayed on the Lakota reservation I ate a lot of Indian tacos, fry bread & buffalo (which was really good). And when I was 9 I visited Guatemala and got to enjoy the fresh cooking of Tortillas for every meal fresh off the stove. You can say I’ve had a interesting connection with food from all these different cultures which is why I think I look at food so highly. All those cultures in someway have a connection to the earth & spirit and put a lot of love in the food when they cook it. ❤️

Ok I hope you enjoyed my blog post for this week & I hope you will help us put out a really dope Youth Food Justice Zine that we can spread around and youth you are not or don’t know about Food Justice hyped about it. Here are all the details on how to do that below:

Until next time blog world stay safe & go play in the dirt and grow, eat, love, live! 🌎🌱❤️

Who are we?
A group of four activists that are passionate about youth, and food justice!
Meet Ayisah, Victoria, Beatriz, and Miyuki.

What are we doing?
Making a zine that lifts up the voices of youth food justice activists as well as intergenerational narratives around youth power within the context of the United States.

How can you help?
We want to include as many voices in this zine as possible! Send us your art (drawings, lyrics, slam poetry, photos, collages, rhymes, reflections etc.) and writings around food justice work. Know of any amazing youth groups doing work around food justice? Know of someone in your community that needs to be interviewed? This is your opportunity to do some multimedia investigations and send us your results. You can also help us out by sharing this call for submissions in your social media networks and in person to friends who might be interested in submitting.

Topics for submission: General
Food Justice
Food Sovereignty
Food Systems
Environmental Justice
Food as medicine
Food Culture
Hunger
Community Food
Youth & Food
Food Movement
Food Workers
Food & Race
Food & Gender

Topics for submission: Detail
Good Food For All
Food Access
Community Food Projects
Health and Nutrition
Affordable Healthy Food
Labor
Farm Worker Rights
Restaurant Worker Rights
Justice for Food Workers
Living Wages, no matter what their Citizenship Status is
Paid Sick Leave
Our Food
Knowing where your food comes from.
Food Stories & Histories
Food & Culture
Food & Nutrition Education for All
Food Sovereignty
Resisting GMOs (Labeling, banning)
Land
Urban & Rural Farming/Gardening
Food and Institutions
School Food
Food Stamps/SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program)
WIC (Women, Infants and Children)
Child and Adult Feed Programs
Emergency Food (Food Pantries, Food Banks, Soup Kitchens)
Food Corporations (accountability, industrialization, junk food marketing)

What do we mean by youth power?
Although no movement should be exclusively youth led (we believe movements should be intergenerational), we believe that youth power and creativity in movements is crucial to collective liberation. Togetherness is the only thing historically that has shifted struggle or built power.
Youth have influence in changing policies that affect them and have the right to self-determination.
Knowledge plus action is Power and Power is used to Create Change.
Empowers youth to be leaders who know how to take care of land & people alike.
Provides a platform to learn about the exploitation occurring in food systems around the world.
Respects and holds space for youth voice and action around issues that impact them directly. Honors that youth who are impacted by an issues are best positioned to create solutions for addressing those same issues.

Send all submissions (see below for guidelines) to:

zine@whyhunger.org

or by mail to:
WhyHunger
Zine Project C/O Beatriz Beckford
505 8th Avenue
Suite 2100
New York NY 10018

Deadline for submission is April 1st 2015 by 5pm EST.

Content can range from:
visual art
poetry,
declarative statements,
constructive criticisms,
narratives,
information about group activities,
political cartoons
to any type of cultural and political expression.

Guidelines:
This will be a half-size zine. Submissions should be 1-4 pages.
Along with your submission, please include a brief (one sentence) bio and contact information; submissions can also be made anonymously.
We will go through a consensus-based editorial process. If you send us a submission, we will be in touch with you to let you know if your piece has been accepted.
We welcome all kinds of submissions. Text-based submissions should be in .doc, .rtf, or .txt format, and artistic submissions should be 300-600 dpi .jpg .tiff or .pdf files. Make sure each page is 5.5” x 8.5” (half letter) or 8.5” x 11” (full page).
If you have questions about format, please contact us at zine@whyhunger.org.

Deadline for submission is April 1st 2015 by 5pm EST.

For more info, visit our website at: youthfoodjusticezine.wordpress.com and follow us on facebook: facebook.com/youthfoodjusticezine and on Twitter: @youthFJzine

WhyHunger’s Food Justice Voices series was created to support and amplify the voices of people working to regain control of their communities’ food system. Telling their own stories, these individual leaders and communities are on the front lines shaping the movement to alleviate food insecurity and build food justice across America. WhyHunger believes that telling one’s story is not only an act of reclaiming in the face of the dominant food narrative of this country, but also an affirmation that the small acts of food sovereignty happening across the country add up to a powerful, vital collective. Learn more at whyhunger.org

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Beyond Feeding My Stomach By Miyuki Baker

I found this piece in a magazine I used to edit called Overlaps. It’s from 2012 but I still have many of the same questions. These days I’ve been 95% vegan. I generally label myself as vegan but was told by a very strict vegan friend that since I’m known to eat an egg or two per month, I shouldn’t go around calling myself a vegan. I disagree with her opinion, but I do see that calling myself “vegan” or any other label can be limiting.

Anyways, hope you enjoy these words about food, culture, and my Japanese heritage.

I’ve been thinking a lot about food lately. I recently completed a 21-day cleanse (slip-ups-once-in-a-while-is-okay kind of cleanse) in which I ate a vegan, mostly gluten-free and processed sugars-free diet. That meant I was pretty much eating only out of the salad bar at my college dining hall. To spice things up, I carried dried seaweed to reconstitute in a bowl of water to add on top of my salads. Bringing the dried and shriveled up seaweed back to their plump and glossy state took me back home where my Japanese mother puts seaweed in every meal.

It’s actually quite an amazing system my mother uses, in line with a traditional Japanese diet. This consists of the following set of foods. Beans, sesame seeds, seaweed, vegetables, fish, mushrooms, yams (mame まめ, goma ごま, wakame わかめ, yasai やさい, shiitake しいたけ, imo いも) The first letter of each food group forms the sentence まごはやさしい or “grandchildren are kind (in the sense of filial piety)” It amuses me that such a saying sneaks into a mnemonic about foods to eat, but that’s another discussion entirely.

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In any case, I grew up with an incredible chef as a mother who not only worked her butt off to put delicious food in front of my father and I but also cared so much about the nutritional values of said foods. She would literally point out each food group from the ma-go-wa-ya-sashi-yi list in our meals, viewing it as a game of sorts, clucking her tongue if she missed a food group or two. There were several occasions where I sent me into the kitchen to grab the mortar and pestle to grind up some sesame seeds to complete the set.

Coming from such a healthy and mindful diet, but distinctly Japanese diet of fish stock and pork fat, my vegetarian, vegan and celiac friends I encountered in college and elsewhere surprised me. Wasn’t a wellbalanced diet, one that ate many things but in moderation? I questioned the authenticity of such diets as I recounted episodes of embarrassment in my childhood during which elementary school classmates would wrinkle their faces in disgust at the sight of something my mother had labored to create and say “ewww, what’s that?” We Americans often have problematic relationships with our food. In many cases, kids think of french fries as a good representative of vegetables, and Red 40 strawberry popsicles as fruit. I was surrounded by friends who grew up in households where the only fruit they had were apples, oranges and bananas. Ironically, the only consistent fruit Swarthmore serves are these very fruits.

Variety tends to make us think of access and privilege, but why must we deny people the right to connect with the earth? Ditch the expensive health food stores that charge $2 per organic avocado. No, actually, buy a couple of organic avocados, take the pits and make an orchard of avocado trees, and make guacamole for everyone in the neighborhood! Of course it’s so hard to remember that seeds grow into plants and that real animals lay eggs when everything is covered in plastic and cardboard. When I worked on an organic meat farm a couple of years ago, I couldn’t help but revel in the beauty of each new size and color of the chicken eggs. Why would I want it to be so uniform and white after seeing the variety that exists in nature?

And yet there are so many ways in which people interact with their food, influenced by religion, class, race, politics, gender and other social factors. There are so many ways of talking about food that it becomes overwhelming to talk mindfully about it with others. I think we all have our own histories and cultures surrounding food that impact the way in which we view our food and its functions. While going on a cleanse made me realize that my body felt lighter and cleaner, less weighed down when I wasn’t filling it up with things that have been known to take lots of energy to process–gluten, sugar, meat etc., but it has also made me think a lot about the traditional Japanese diet and diets of different cultures. I grew up hearing about the Okinawans (the southernmost island of Japan) who eat every part of the pig, as well as an incredible amount of bitter melon–apparently a magical pairing that put them at the top 3 of longest living and healthy people in the world.

Then last night I had a moment with some friends over a bag of shrimp flavored chips, the Asian kind. Having conveniently ignored the ingredients list on the back of the bag, I cringed as one of my friends read off the list. MSG, shrimp and weird oils that I don’t know the origin of. I responded that foreign food “didn’t count.” Can I get to the bottom of this? In my mind, many of these so-called “foreign foods” are linked to my childhood, my culture and to my sense of belonging. Sure, that’s largely due to socialization but could there be something more fundamental to the way certain groups of people eat? Do I have a right to deny this food? Do I want to? What am I doing to my soul when I deny my stomach? Is it a denial? Does converting something traditional into a vegan dish make it less appetizing to the soul? I’m still trying to figure out how to eat so that I’m being good to my body and my soul, and of course to animals, the environment and workers in the food industry. In the meantime I want to talk to you about all of this. LET’S TALK ABOUT FOOD! Maybe you’ll convince me to stop calling myself a flegan (a flexible vegan), or perhaps I’ll show you how to make vegan chia seed chocolate pudding.

This is a part of our blog series to let people know that we’re calling for submissions to include in a new youth food justice zine! Check it out here!

You can read more of Miyuki’s work at her blog: http://www.heymiyuki.wordpress.com

Follow her IG: @heymiyuki or Twitter: @miyukibaker

Call for Submissions!

youthfoodjusticezineYouthZineFlyer

Who are we?

A group of four activists that are passionate about youth, and  food justice! Meet Ayisah, Victoria, Beatriz, and Miyuki 🙂

What are we doing?
Making a zine that lifts up the voices of youth food justice activists as well as intergenerational narratives around youth power within the context of the United States.

How can you help?

We want to include as many voices in this zine as possible! Send us your art (drawings, lyrics, slam poetry, photos, collages, rhymes, reflections etc.) and writings around food justice work. Know of any amazing youth groups doing work around food justice? Know of someone in your community that needs to be interviewed? This is your opportunity to do some multimedia investigations and send us your results. You can also help us out by sharing this call for submissions in your social media networks and in person to friends who might be interested in submitting.

Topics for submission: General

  • Food Justice
  • Food Sovereignty
  • Food Systems
  • Environmental Justice
  • Food as medicine
  • Food Culture
  • Hunger
  • Community Food
  • Youth & Food
  • Food Movement
  • Food Workers
  • Food & Race
  • Food & Gender

Topics for submission: Detail

  • Good Food For All
    • Food Access
    • Community Food Projects
    • Health and Nutrition
    • Affordable Healthy Food
  • Labor
    • Farm Worker Rights
    • Restaurant Worker Rights
    • Justice for Food Workers
    • Living Wages, no matter what their Citizenship Status is
    • Paid Sick Leave
  • Our Food
    • Knowing where your food comes from.
    • Food Stories & Histories
    • Food & Culture
    • Food & Nutrition Education for All
  • Food Sovereignty
    • Resisting GMOs (Labeling, banning)
    • Land
    • Urban & Rural Farming/Gardening
  • Food and Institutions
    • School Food
    • Food Stamps/SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program)
    • WIC (Women, Infants and Children)
    • Child and Adult Feed Programs
    • Emergency Food (Food Pantries, Food Banks, Soup Kitchens)
    • Food Corporations (accountability, industrialization, junk food marketing)

What do we mean by youth power?

  • Although no movement should be exclusively youth led (we believe movements should be intergenerational), we believe that youth power and creativity in movements is crucial to collective liberation. Togetherness is the only thing historically that has shifted struggle or built power.
  • Youth have influence in changing policies that affect them and have the right to self-determination.
  • Knowledge plus action is Power and Power is used to Create Change.
  • Empowers youth to be leaders who know how to take care of land & people alike.
  • Provides a platform to learn about the exploitation occurring in food systems around the world.
  • Respects and holds space for youth voice and action around issues that impact them directly.  Honors that youth who are impacted by an issues are best positioned to create solutions for addressing those same issues.

Send all submissions (see below for guidelines) to:

zine@whyhunger.org

or by mail to:

WhyHunger

Zine Project C/O Beatriz Beckford

505 8th Avenue

Suite 2100

New York NY 10018

Deadline for submission is April 1st 2015 by 5pm EST.

Content can range from:

  • visual art
  • poetry,
  • declarative statements,
  • constructive criticisms,
  • narratives,
  • information about group activities,
  • political cartoons
  • to any type of cultural and political expression.

Guidelines:

  • This will be a half-size zine. Submissions should be 1-4 pages.
  • Along with your submission, please include a brief (one sentence) bio and contact information; submissions can also be made anonymously.
  • We will go through a consensus-based editorial process. If you send us a submission, we will be in touch with you to let you know if your  piece has been accepted.
  • We welcome all kinds of submissions. Text-based submissions should be in .doc, .rtf, or .txt format, and artistic submissions should be 300-600 dpi .jpg .tiff or .pdf files. Make sure each page is 5.5” x 8.5” (half letter) or 8.5” x 11” (full page).
  • If you have questions about format, please contact us at zine@whyhunger.org.

Deadline for submission is April 1st 2015 by 5pm EST.

For more info, follow us on facebook: facebook.com/youthfoodjusticezine and on Twitter: @youthFJzine